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After the toys come home, how do I keep my kids safe?

Sunday, 26 March, 2017

After you've bought safe toys, it's also important to make sure kids know how to use them. The best way to do this is by supervising play. Playing with your kids teaches them how to play safely while having fun.

Parents should:

  • Teach kids to put toys away.
  • Throw away broken toys or repair them right away. Christine Macomber, MD, a pediatrician at Generations Family Practice says. "I recommend periodically checking your toys for wear and tear. Broken down plastic can make for sharp edges and small attachments can loosen creating choking hazards."
  • Check toys regularly to make sure that they aren't broken or unusable:
    • Wooden toys shouldn't have splinters.
    • Bikes and outdoor toys shouldn't have rust.
    • Stuffed toys shouldn't have broken seams or exposed removable parts.
  • Store outdoor toys when they're not in use so that they are not exposed to rain or snow.

And be sure to keep toys clean. Some plastic toys can be cleaned in the dishwasher, but read the manufacturer's directions first. Another option is to mix antibacterial soap or a mild dishwashing detergent with hot water in a spray bottle and use it to clean toys, rinsing them afterward.

Dangerous Objects
Many non-toys also can tempt kids. It's important to keep them away from:

  • fireworks
  • matches
  • sharp scissors
  • balloons (un-inflated or broken balloons can be choking hazards)

Reporting Unsafe Toys
Check the CPSC website for the latest information about toy recalls or call their hotline at (800) 638-CPSC to report a toy you think is unsafe. If you have any doubt about a toy's safety, err on the side of caution and do not allow your child to play with it.

[source http://kidshealth.org/]

Are the toys that your kids play with safe?

Sunday, 26 March, 2017

Did you know that toys send more than 26,000 children to the emergency room every year? In fact, toy-related injuries involving American children has jumped about 40 percent according to an analysis by the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. That can be very scary information for parents - however, many of these injuries can be prevented. As parents, we must arm ourselves with information and awareness of the toys on the markets and what to look for in toy safety.

“Purchasing age appropriate toys is one easy first step to ensure that the toys are more safe for your child.” Says Dr. Christine Macomber, pediatrician at Generations Family Practice. “Also, keep in mind that siblings like to play with each other and their toys. In our home, the Legos would come out during our baby's naptime or after bed - that way, choking on a small toy was one less thing for me to worry about!”

Below is a graphic that we put together discussing other safety features to be aware of. We hope that you find it informative. Keeping your whole family safe and healthy is Generations Family Practice's top priority!

[Coming up -- Part Three: After the toys come home, how do I keep my kids safe?]

Evolution of Toy Safety

Sunday, 26 March, 2017
Evolution of Toy Safety

As the excitement and festivities of the holidays fade away, many households will be left with a small avalanche of new toys bestowed upon its children. These new items of fascination and joy will be loved upon and played with by the ones we cherish most. But what do you know about these toys? Are they safe?

New toys are meant to bring enjoyment. But sometimes there are products that are released to consumers that could cause our children harm. This is the FIRST PART in a THREE PART SERIES regarding TOY SAFETY. It is intended to educate and better enable you to protect your kids. Because toys should not bring tears, only smiles!

Part One: Evolution of Toys and Toy Safety Standards

For centuries, children of all ages have sought out ways to entertain themselves. As civilizations grew more complex, so have the toys and games available. Below is a historical overview of the evolution of toys, as well as toy safety standards imposed due to harmful products.

  • 400 B.C.: A Babylonian board game is played that was probably an ancestor of chess and checkers.
  • 300 B.C.: The first game resembling backgammon is played in Ancient Samaria. Stone marbles are first used in Egypt.
  • Mid-18400’s: The first American doll maker is granted a patent and dolls begin to be mass-produced in America for the first time. Alphabet Blocks become favorites and help children learn their alphabet the old-fashioned way.
  • 1880’s: The first BB gun is created. The BB gun is a descendant of the cap gun, which was invented soon after the Civil War, when some shotgun manufacturers converted their factories to make toys.
  • Around 1900: Edwin Binney and C. Harold Smith produce the first box of Crayola crayons.
  • 1930’s: Alfred M. Butts, an unemployed architect from Poughkeepsie, N.Y., invents a word game called the “Criss Cross Game.” In 1948, Butts sells rights to the game to entrepreneur James Brunot, who trademarks the game under the name Scrabble.
  • 1940’s: Candy Land, Chutes and Ladders, the Slinky and Silly Putty are introduced.
  • 1950’s: Matchbox cars, Yahtzee and Play-doh are rolled out onto the market.
  • 1955: New York's director of safety advised the state's fire chiefs to seize fake Davy Crockett coonskin caps from stores. Made of shredded paper, the caps burst into flame "in seconds after the most casual exposure to a live cigarette or to any spark."
  • 1960’s: Kids now have Twister, the Easy Bake Oven and the Nerf ball as play options.
  • 1965: Toys”R”Us opens its doors.
  • 1966: Child Protection Act enlarges the scope of the Federal Hazardous Substances Labeling Act to ban hazardous toys and other articles so hazardous that adequate label warnings could not be written.
  • Late 1960’s: The Zulu toy gun was popular with kids. Like a peashooter, the Zulu gun was mouth powered, shooting little plastic darts. Before long, emergency rooms around the country began seeing a surge in accidental ingestions of plastic darts, as children inhaled hard before blowing out.
  • 1969: President Nixon signed into law the Toy Safety Act, the first national safety standard for playthings. The act authorized the Department of Health, Education and Welfare to test and ban hazardous toys. The Zulu was one of eight toys the National Commission on Product Safety in 1969 recommended be banned. Others included the Empire Little Lady Stove, which had oven racks that could heat to 600 degrees, and the Bird of Paradise slingshot with razor-sharp missiles.
  • 1970’s: The card game Uno and Dungeons & Dragons hit the market.
  • 1973: Consumer Product Safety Commission created by Congress; takes over programs pioneered by FDA under 1927 Caustic Poison Act, 1960 Federal Hazardous Substances Labeling Act, 1966 Child Protection Act, and PHS accident prevention activities for safety of toys, home appliances, etc.
  • 1983: The Cabbage Patch Kids doll comes into the toy world a huge hit and leaves frantic parents searching endlessly for the coveted Christmas gift.
  • 1983: Cute little stuffed critters, dubbed Beanie Babies, become all the rage.
  • 1988: A pointy metal stake that you throw into the area while a bunch of people stand around...What could possibly go wrong? More than 6,500 people reported lawn dart injuries before they were recalled and made illegal.
  • 2002: Mattel closes last U.S. factory and moves production to China.
  • 2007: Mattel recalls nearly one million toys in the U.S. because products are covered in lead paint. All toys were manufactured in China.
  • 2007: In early 2007, The Easy Bake Oven was found to cause children getting their fingers or hands caught in the oven’s opening. Hasbro offers a free retro-fit kit designed to eliminate the danger. However, injuries continued with another 250 reports received. Over 70 of those children received burns, many severe. One child required a partial finger amputation due to her injuries. Hasbro issues a full recall on all Easy Bake Ovens manufactured after 2006. Since then the design has been updated and is considered safe for children over the age of 8.
  • 2010: According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, toy-related deaths to children younger than 15 increased to 17 fatalities reported in 2010, up from 15 reported in 2009. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), more than 250,000 toy-related injuries were treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms in 2010. Of those, about one third involved kids under 5.

As one can see, toys have come a long way over time. And, thankfully, their safety standards have evolved as well. “The advancement in toy safety allows us to be proactive in caring for the well being of our children-whether it be with their toys, car seats, cribs, etc.” states Dr. Christine Macomber, a pediatrician at Generations Family Practice. “When available, registering purchased items will allow the company to inform you of known hazards and take steps before injury occurs.”

[sources: http://www.toyinfo.org/ ; http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/WhatWeDo/History/Milestones/ucm128305.htm ; http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/gadgets/toys/4347051#slide-1 ]

[Coming up -- Part Two: How do I know if my children’s toys are safe?]
 

How to Enjoy a Healthy Thanksgiving Holiday!

Sunday, 26 March, 2017

It’s upon us once again, the holiday travel season. Crowds, rushing, stressing, shopping, eating, etc, it all takes it toll. But it doesn’t have to. This Thanksgiving holiday, check out my favorite healthy travel and general holiday coping tips to help you get through with flying autumnal colors!

Check out these tips to keep healthy and sane this holiday travel season:

  • Pack patience! Now that the TSA has added heightened security measures and airlines have tacked on more fees, flying can be a beast. Do your best to give yourself enough time to get through the lines and know that it’s all just part of the experience.
  • Pack good attitude! Nothing spoils a holiday trip or exacerbates any problems more then a sour disposition. Do your best to make the most of the situation and enjoy the season because it only comes once a year. You never know what great memories you will make if you’re willing to enjoy the holiday!
  • Eat before you leave the house. You should always leave with a full tummy or you will be tempted to nosh on whatever is convenient. And that means expensive junk food that’s bad for you and the trash cans!
  • Know before you go. Know which airports you will be flying in and out of, laying over at, etc. Most have websites that show what dining establishments can be found in each terminal. For instance, I know that the Delta terminal at LAX has a Starbucks (for my soy latte) and a CPK express where I can grab a salad or soup for the flight. Most international hubs have chain restaurants or familiar fast food counters where you can order up a healthy meal for your in flight pleasure. From a veggie salad or sandwich at Quiznos to a black Bean Burger at Chili’s To Go, there are ways to not give in to bags of pretzels and pounds of danishes to keep you from passing out on your flight. The World Travel Guide site will lead you to each city’s airport web site.
  • Stay Hydrated. Seeing as how we cannot bring our own beverages from home anymore, the first purchase to make upon entering your gate is a big bottle of water. Or better yet, pack your favorite glass or BPA-free bottle in your carry on bag and fill it at the airport. This way you save money and you aren’t drinking unhealthy water or contributing to landfill waste. Above all else, staying hydrated during air travel is key to cutting down on fatigue and fighting off the munchies!
  • Take your vitamins & eat your veggies. If you’re running around and not able to eat balanced meals on your travel day, be sure to pack water soluble vitamin packets. In addition, there are many powdered veggie drinks that you can down and get your recommended servings of veggies a day to keep your immune system top notch when sucking in recycled air. My favorite brand for both is To Go Brands Go Greens and Vitamin C packs.
  • Stay away from caffeine. Drinking caffeinated beverages on or before a flight will keep you from relaxing on the plane. In addition, it messes with your insulin levels and can cause you to overeat.
  • Don’t drink alcohol in flight. Alcoholic beverages have double the effect in the air as they do on the ground,  so you’re definitely gonna feel crappy when you get to your destination. If you need to relax, grab some all natural melatonin to help you sleep along with some soothing tunes.
  • Pack snacks. Stock up on healthy bars, nuts and even sandwiches. Pack your carry-on with your own goodies so you aren’t spending money at the terminal on expensive, crappy food to be sure and have something on hand when hunger strikes.
  • Sleep well the night before travel. That’s the toughest with the anticipation and stress that comes with flying during the holidays, but it can be done. And if not, invest in a flight pillow, eye mask, earplugs or noise reducing headphones and a blanket. Bring all the comforts of home with you to make your catching ZZZs in the air easier.
  • Plan ahead! Know where you’re going directly after you pick up your bags at your destination. Home, hotel, family’s house, wherever – map out what is close by in case you need to pick up a snack or a full blown meal so you don’t keel over and start your vacation on a bad foot.

As far as getting through the stressful holidays without any familial or friend tension, here are some good rule of thumb tips for holiday gatherings that will keep the peace during this festive season:

  • While conversation is a must, and can be very enjoyable, over the holiday dinner table, specific topics should not be discussed. While no one likes to dinner over awkward or superficial chatter, no one likes a meal to turn ugly. Obviously the biggies to stay away from are politics, religion and sex (unless of course your group enjoys those topics). For the most part, not everyone will agree on such topics and it’s best to leave them alone. In fact, this includes veganism. The holiday table is not a place to stand on your soapbox unless it has been asked of you. In addition, it is not a place for attack on someone who is different. If a topic comes up that you are uncomfortable with, politely let them know that you do not wish to discuss that particular topic at that time. Shut it down with a smile and offer up a new topic.
  • Never assume that a host will be able to provide everything you need.  Always be prepared. It is impossible to make everyone happy and sometimes folks are left out of certain things.  If you have special dietary needs, be sure to let your host know ahead of time and offer to bring a dish that you can eat and share with the group. Or to be extra safe, eat before you got to the dinner so that you aren’t left starving during the meal.  The holidays are about enjoying the company of others so do your best to focus on that instead of what you can and can’t eat.
  • If you are hosting a meal, be mindful of others. In fact, the best way to have a happy gathering is to share the experience. Potluck dinners are the best way to include everyone and the onus doesn’t fall on you to feed a bunch of folks who may or may not like your taste in food.
  • If you aren’t feeling well or are in a particularly foul mood, admit it. Do what you can to handle your emotions before heading to a gathering. It’s not healthy for you or the other guests if you aren’t up for it or worse, taking it out on them. If you can pull through and try to have a good time, great. Otherwise, we all have bad days so do what you need to do to sort it out because nothing ruins your holiday and others like a foul mood.
  • Nobody’s perfect – try to plan ahead. I know this sounds like common sense, but it’s really important to remember. If you want to have people over and you’re working, don’t go crazy trying to make everything – get some food at the deli or the gourmet shop. A lot of times, people don’t mind bringing a salad or dessert. The point is to get together and celebrate with people, rather than trying to make it perfect.
  • Traditions can be changed. This might be hard for people, but there are a lot of people who actually dread the holidays, and some of that may be due to the way they’re celebrated. Maybe you don’t have to always be at Great Aunt Sue’s house, even though she’s hosted the holiday for years. Think of these things as being fluid and when they’re outmoded or outdated, come up with some new ones.
  • Don’t let the details take over. It’s difficult to find the time to get everything done during the holidays, but it’s the people who are really important to you and those who take care of you, that you must remember. Try not to be so overwhelmed doing things like writing out Christmas cards that you can’t talk to your loved ones. Don’t brush people off because of the holiday madness.
  • Always thank people. Whether it’s in writing or in person, you must put gratitude at the top. There’s never an excuse for not thanking someone for an invite or gift.
  • Remember that the holidays are about connection with others, understanding and love. The best rule, year round, is to treat others how you like to be treated, and there is no exception to that rule, especially over the holidays!
  • Also, this Thanksgiving, do your best to practice the act of gratitude, regardless of who you are with or where you happen to be this holiday. While the feast seems to take center stage next to football, parades and crazy black Friday shopping, the true meaning of this holiday is to give thanks so make sure that you don’t forget to do so this year!

[Courtesy of Carolyn Scott-Hamilton, www.healthyvoyager.com]

Prior Authorization Fee for Prescription Drugs

Sunday, 26 March, 2017

As your primary care medical practice, the Generations Family Practice providers make every effort to ensure that you receive the safest, most effective and reasonably priced prescription drugs, treatments, laboratory tests and imaging studies we feel is best suited for your healthcare. We must also abide by regulations set by your insurance companies and government agencies. Over the last year, many health insurance companies or plans are requiring Prior Authorization or approval for an increasing number of drugs, treatments, imaging studies and laboratory tests.

As this is an additional and labor-intensive service our nursing staff completes, Generations Family Practice will begin charging a fee of $25 per authorization as of November 1. This cost is an out-of-pocket expense to you and is not covered by insurance.

You can be assured that your provider will take every step necessary to provide you with cost effective treatments and alternatives. We will fully evaluate your medical needs, and if appropriate, recommend a medication that does not require a Prior Authorization. Should no alternative be available that would meet your medical needs, Generations Family Practice will waive the $25 authorization fee if the ordered medication, test or treatment is a direct result, and is made at the time of, a visit to the practice. Prior authorizations required as a result of telephone requests from patients will always be charged the $25 fee.

Please feel free to contact our office at 919-852-3999 with any questions.
 

Beat the Blues with Exercise

Sunday, 26 March, 2017

Depression is a serious health issue, whether we're talking clinical depression (major depressive disorder), mild depression, seasonal affective disorder (or appropriately, "SAD" – depressive symptoms that often occur during the fall / winter months) or just "feeling blue." Fortunately, there's a simple, natural solution to help deal with depression: exercise.

When you're depressed, exercise is probably last on your list of priorities; curling up on the couch may seem infinitely more appealing than heading off to the gym for a vigorous workout. Yet an abundance of research suggests exercise is an ideal natural remedy when you feel depressed – and science backs it up.

According to the Mayo Clinic, here are some of the reasons why exercise may be an effective way to combat depression:

  • Releases "feel-good" brain chemicals (neurotransmitters, endorphins and endocannabinoids)
  • Reduces immune-system chemicals that have been implicated in depression
  • Increases body temperature, which may provide a sense of calm, reducing anxiety
  • Helps you deal with your depression in a healthy, productive way
  • Boosts self-confidence, which can make you feel better about yourself
  • May provide for more social interaction, improving your mood

If you're feeling depressed, take it seriously. Talk to your doctor about how you're feeling.

[borrowed from "'To Your Health", Vol. 08, Issue 10]

Introducing Generations Skin Centre

Sunday, 26 March, 2017

Generations Skin Centre is a unique offering of cosmetic and aesthetic skin care services and products.

Since 2005, Generations Family Practice has strived to provide its patients with the highest quality medical care. Our team believes that a part of feeling good is looking your best. For that reason, we are now offering some of the most popular cosmetic medical services available today. Generations’ highly trained staff can provide you with quality non-surgical alternatives to skin tightening, age spot removal, and a variety of other skin correcting procedures and products.

You can enjoy:

​This addition of the Skin Centre is just another step in our goal of providing the best comprehensive primary medical care available ~ all under one roof!

See our Price List

    Evolution of Cosmetic Procedures

    Sunday, 26 March, 2017

    Plastic surgery, derived from the Greek word plastikos, means “to mold.” Through time these practices have held a critical place in many cultures. For centuries, tribes would disc their lips, stretch their earlobes, bind their feet, file their teeth, and tattoo and scar their skin. While filed teeth may not appeal to everyone, men and women of today still have a wide range of surgical procedures from which to choose, including liposuction, nose jobs, eyelid surgery, tummy tucks, and breast augmentation and reduction. The term “plastic surgery” also includes nonsurgical options such as Botox, microdermabrasion, collagen injections, laser hair removal, and chemical peels.

    Today’s practices are very different from those of our past. Plastic surgery was not readily available and was often shrouded in mystery and magic.

    Rhinoplasty's beginning

    Rhinoplasty’s Beginning

    Believe it or not the earliest known Rhinoplasties (or ‘Nose Job’) was first mentioned in an Ancient Egyptian medical text known as the Edwin Smith Papyrus. This text is the oldest known surgical treatise, dating back to the Old Kingdom of 3000 to 2500 BC. The Egyptians were shown to prepare their dead using principles of plastic surgery. For example, Ramses II's mummy was surgically altered by having a small bone and a handful of seeds inserted into his nose to ensure that his most prominent feature would be recognizable in the afterlife.

    Ancient India

    The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery on the living is found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts. These texts describe procedures to repair noses and ears that were lost either as punishment for crimes (such as adultery) or in battle. Hindu surgeon Sushruta, described the “attached flap” method of plastic surgery in his 600 B.C. text 'Sushruta Samhita' [see image to right]. The procedure involves reconstructing the nose by cutting skin from either the cheek or forehead, twisting the skin skin-side-out over a leaf of the appropriate size, and sewing the skin into place. This method became known as the “Indian Method of Rhinoplasty” and was kept secret for centuries in India.

    Beautification in RomeHeinrich von Pfolspeundt's nose job

    Romans were the first to use plastic surgery to improve self-image. Roman, Aulus Cornelius Celsus, wrote “De Medicina” which was the plastic surgeon’s reference guide for more than 1700 years. By the first century B.C. Romans were very practiced in advanced plastic surgery. Some common surgeries included:

    • Procedures for wealthy women whose ears had become stretched due to the weight of their earrings.
    • Freed slaves had the brands that marked them as property either removed or covered.
    • Roman doctors would try various reconstructive procedures on the constant supply of Roman soldiers.

    Europe Joins the Search for Beauty

    By the mid-15th-century, European surgeons began to consider the possibilities of creating and improving our facial features. Heinrich von Pfolspeundt described a process “to make a new nose for one who lacks it entirely, and the dogs have devoured it” by removing skin from the back of the arm and suturing it in place [see image to right]. Although this process created less scaring, it did require the patient’s forearm to be awkwardly attached to the nose for 21 days.

    In 1597, Italian Gasparo Tagliacozzi, known as the “father of modern plastic surgery” wrote the first plastic surgery textbook, “De curtorum chirugiau .”

    The Rise of Breast Augmentation
    Timmie Jean Lindsey

    The first documented breast augmentation surgery was preformed in 1895 by transplanting tissue from the patient’s back to the breast to correct asymmetry. Within a few years, the first injectable materials began to be used for breast implants. These included paraffin, beeswax and vegetable oil.

    By the 20th Century, breast enlargement became a sought after procedure. The first woman to successfully receive silicone breast implants was Timmie Jean Lindsey. This is now considered the most popular cosmetic surgery operation in Europe and the United States.

    War and Plastic Surgery

    War has played a significant role in the history of plastic surgery. Trench warfare in WWI meant heads and necks were more vulnerable, and pilots and passengers in the new and dangerous airplanes often suffered serious facial injuries that were unprecedented any time in history. Injuries such as shattered jaws, blown-off noses, and gaping skull wounds accelerated the techniques and experimentation of plastic surgery and prompted Harold Delf Gilles to establish the first hospital devoted to reconstructive plastic surgery. WWII went on to usher in such plastic surgery techniques as rebuilding entire limbs, extensive skin grafts, microsurgery, antibodies, as well as increased knowledge about tissue health.

    War time cosmetic procedures

    Because any untrained surgeon could claim to be a plastic surgeon, patients often experience severe complications, such as amputation or at the very least severe scarring. Plastic surgery became associated in many minds with the term “quack.” However, when surgeons who had served in WWI established the American Association of Plastic Surgeons, they effectively signaled the end of unregulated plastic surgery. This first association was joined by the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons in 1931 (renamed American Society of Plastic Surgeons in 1991) and by the American Board of Plastic Surgery in 1937.

    Continued Advances

    • 1930 plastic surgeons spur invention of shatterproof windshields
    • 1939 invention of Dermatome to help burn victims
    • 1950 Ralph Millard performs first cleft lip repair
    • Late 1970’s – first use of bovine-collagen. This injectable caused considerable swelling and did not last long as an option.
    • 2003 development of Cosmoplast, a human form of collagen
    • 2005 first face transplant
    • 2007 introduction of Juvaderm, a hyaluronic acid filler. This new alternative lasts longer and has less side effects than previous options.

    Future of Cosmetic Procedures

    Today, surgery patients fall into two categories; reconstructive and cosmetic. Reconstructive plastic surgery is performed to correct functional impairments caused by burns; traumatic injuries, such as facial bone fractures and breaks; congenital abnormalities, such as cleft palates or cleft lips; developmental abnormalities; infection and disease; and cancer or tumors. Cosmetic surgery is an optional procedure that is performed on normal parts of the body with the only purpose of improving a person’s appearance and/or removing signs of aging. In 2006, nearly 11 million cosmetic procedures were performed in the United States alone. The number of cosmetic procedures performed in the United States has increased over 50 percent since the start of the century. Judging by statistics and the modern trend towards looking and feeling your best, surgery for cosmetic purposes will likely continue to increase year over year.

    [Sources: Random History, “Beautiful Body – A History of Plastic Surgery” ; American Society of Plastic Surgeons, “History of Plastic Surgery” ; Historical Honey, “The Fascinating History of Cosmetic Surgery”]

    Since 2005, Generations Family Practice has strived to provide its patients with the highest quality medical care. Our team believes that a part of feeling good is looking your best. For that reason, we are now offering some of the most popular cosmetic medical services available today. Generations’ highly trained staff can provide you with quality non-surgical alternatives to skin tightening, age spot removal, and a variety of other skin correcting procedures and products.

    • Rejuvapen
    • Ultherapy
    • Minor dermatology procedures
    • Chemical Peels
    • BabyFoot foot peel
    • Skin care products
    • And more!

    This addition of the Skin Centre is just another step in our goal of providing the best comprehensive primary medical care available ~ all under one roof!

     

    TOP TEN COUNTDOWN TO FAMILY DAY & HEALTH FAIR - NUMBER TEN

    Sunday, 26 March, 2017

    ...and the FINAL REASON why you should not miss TOMORROW'S Health Fair -- AWESOME RAFFLE PRIZES, discounts and cool giveaways!!

    So not only can you enjoy a day of FREE Health Screenings, take in demonstrations and discussions on various medical topics, get your Flu Vaccine, watch Championship Golf, enjoy seeing your kids play fun games and get their faces painted, eat great food and relax in the company of your neighbors in the community...BUT you can also walk away the winner of super cool prizes! Why would you miss this Great Event?!

    Raffle prizes include:

    • Rejuvapen Treatment
    • BabyFoot Peel Kit
    • Topix Peel Treatment
    • La Farm Gift Certificate
    • Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificate
    • ToysRUs Gift Certificate
    • Basket from Peak Oil Company
    • Andrea Ivan Hair Salon Gift Certificate (Color/Cut/Style)
    • SpineCare Chiropractic Giveaway
    • AND MORE!!

    We hope to see you Saturday (10/11) from 11:30-2pm 

    TOP TEN COUNTDOWN TO FAMILY DAY & HEALTH FAIR - NUMBER TEN

    Sunday, 26 March, 2017

    ...and the FINAL REASON why you not miss TOMORROW'S Health Fair -- AWESOME RAFFLE PRIZES, discounts and cool giveaways!!

    These include:

    • Rejuvapen Treatment
    • BabyFoot Peel Kit
    • Topix Peel Treatment
    • La farm Gift Certificate
    • Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificate
    • ToysRUs Gift Certificate
    • Basket from Peak Oil Company
    • Andrea Ivan Hair Salon Gift Certificate (Color/Cut/Style)
    • SpineCare Chiropractic Giveaway
    • AND MORE!!

    We hope to see you Saturday (10/11) from 11:30-2pm 

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