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Wellness for Generations newsletter - January 2016

Friday, 15 December, 2017
January newsletter

Generations brings you into the New Year with information on thyroid and skin health, tips for kids on keeping those resolutions, a yummy recipe and so much more! Click here to read our latest newsletter.

Look Who Won the Maggy Awards!!

Friday, 15 December, 2017

Congratulations to our very own Dr. Melanie Mintzer who was recognized as a 2016 Maggy Award Winner! This is her second win in a row! We are doubly excited to announce that Dr. Justin Glodowski earned Honorable Mention in the Maggy’s. The Maggy Awards are presented each year by Cary Magazine. More than 11,000 area residents vote for their favorite service heroes, and we’re proud that one of our doctors was chosen. We would like to say ‘Thank you’ to our patients for recognizing Dr. Mintzer! Learn more about the awards or see the full list of winners

How to Spot Skin Cancer

Friday, 15 December, 2017

Anyone can get skin cancer, regardless of skin color. It is estimated that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime. When caught early, skin cancer is highly treatable. Use the information in this graphic, courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology, to check your skin regularly.

 

My Generations Story

Friday, 15 December, 2017

From cradle to rocker, no matter the generation, the practitioners at Generations Family Practice take pride in offering high quality, primary care to each patient. Family medicine is not only our focus, it is our passion. From preventive care or minor emergencies to pediatric or acute care, our knowledgable staff is dedicated to positively impacting the health and well-being of our patients.

But don't take our word for it...read through recent praises from our patients of all generations. And share your Generations story ~ we'd love to hear it!

 


 

"I switched my doctor to Generations Family Practice and I'm glad I did. I have Dr. Glodowski and he's an excellent and caring doctor who really spent a lot of time with me asking questions and getting to the bottom of my problem. He was very thorough. These days, most doctors rush you in and rush you out in order to see as many patients as possible but I can see that Dr. Glodowski really wants to get to the bottom of any medical issue and treat it the right way. He patiently listens and answers questions and goes over lab results very thoroughly." ~Jon (Google reviews)

 

"Professional people who care about you. Having the availability to walk in is truly outstanding. We don't get sick at convenient times, but this practice tries its best to do whatever is possible to serve you. The best doctor's office I have ever visited." ~Sandra (Google reviews)

 

"I highly recommend Lynn. She is an amazing Physician's Assistant. Her bedside manner and knowledge are above average. I look forward to building a lifetime relationship with her and Generations."  ~Lisa (Google reviews)

 

"Dr. Gladowski is amazing. He is great with osteopathy and very thorough. He takes time to get to know the patient and covers all aspects of the patient's health." ~Elizabeth (Google reviews)

 

"I have been seeing Dr. Mintzer for years now. Never have I had a Dr. that took the time to get to me and all that is going on in my life in order to provide a holistic approach to my care. There are simply no words that can describe my gratitude to her and the entire team there!" ~Heather (Google reviews)

 

"Have had fairly pleasant experiences with this office thus far. The nurses are incredibly friendly and professional. Dr. Justin G is very easy going and caring. So far everyone has been welcoming, and helpful when I've had questions and/or needed explanations." ~Carlos (Google reviews)

 

"This is a wonderful practice.  I was nervous about changing medical providers, as I had recently moved to Cary.  I am also nervous about medical visits in general.  I have felt in great hands here from the very first phone contact.  Everyone is competent, supportive, dedicated, and reliable.  I couldn't be more pleased with the care provided here." ~B.T. (YELP reviews)

 

"[After a bad experience elsewhere] I was determined not to make that mistake again, so this time I did a ton of research and found a place that was great quality, but still not very far from my home. Generations Family Practice. I did all the same things again - transferred records, brought in my prescription bottles, came in for an initial appointment, all that. This time was different. Very different. They renewed my prescriptions during the appointment, while I was there. They asked lots of good questions and gave reasonable suggestions. They showed me their patient portal where you can log in, see your history, send questions to your doctor, and see upcoming appointments. The PA I saw was the best I've ever seen, and spent lots of time with me, not just on the first visit, but every visit since then. That's astonishing. They also accept walk-ins, and are open for that purpose on Saturday mornings. So, if you suddenly come down with the flu and need a fast prescription for Tamiflu, they've got you covered. I like them so much that I've since transferred my daughter there too."  ~Sean (YELP reviews)

 

"We've been taking my daughter here since she was born and they have been great. Easy to work with, super accommodating, and you always know they have your best interests in mind! I also like that Dr Macomber studies my daughter rather than relying solely on CDC charts!" ~Josh (YELP reviews)

 

"Knowledgable and friendly. Great hours, and they'll do their best to work you in even if they don't have appointments. Best part is a LIVE PERSON answers the phone! Thanks!" ~Beth (YELP reviews)

 

"I just love Linn! She is so calm which calms me. I find her to be nonjudgmental and professional. Her sincerity is refreshing!" ~Susan (Intuit reviews)

 

"The practitioners and staff are great. I have always had a positive experience." ~Janet (Intuit reviews)

 

[Reviews taken from the following sources: Local Intuit, YELP and Google
 

 

Staying Well and Fit During the Holidays

Friday, 15 December, 2017
Healthy holiday living

Society tells us we’re supposed to be excited and feel some holiday magic this time of year. In reality, this time of year can cause stress, depression, anxiety, and weight gain, making it a tough couple of months for both your mind and your body.

Staying well and fit may seem a greater challenge than hosting parties and buying a gift for that impossible person on your list. But you can maintain a healthy self through the new year with a few steps.

Body

  • Many people gain one pound each year at this time. If you continue that trend, you’ll be overweight in a few years. Yet November and December are a difficult time to start a weight loss regimen. Instead, focus on maintaining your current weight. You’ll feel less pressure and can enjoy the holiday spirit (and a spirit or two!) instead of grumbling like a Grinch when your coworker brings in treats for the second week in a row.
  • Of course, eating right isn’t easy when every party offers plates of sugary treats, cheesy nibbles, and meat bites. Instead of trying to resist it all, try loading up your plate with the vegetable snacks first. After you have had several of those, you’re less likely to eat as much of the rest.
  • When the weather outside is frightful, leaving your warm bed in the dark to jog or go to the gym is more difficult. But keeping up your exercise routine will help maintain your weight during bouts of extra eating and will make you feel better overall. Many find it helpful to check the weather report the night before and have a plan in mind. For example, if you know it’s going to rain, you can plan to work out with an exercise DVD instead of jogging. Or, simply by knowing what you’ll face, you can tell yourself, “I’m going to go to the gym anyway.”
  • Extra social occasions and a bigger to-do list make it tempting to skip the after-work hour at the gym. Try moving your regular routine to your lunch break or to the morning on those days. You can also put your exercise time on your calendar just like any appointment, or arrange to meet a friend there for an added commitment. 
  • Be sure to record your progress and your weight each week so you can see the effect the holiday is having. You’ll be more likely to push away from that cupcake if you realize it’s hurting your goals.
  • Finally, get the family outside for some group exercise. A family walk or active game is a fun way to spend time and keep moving.

Mind

  • The holidays are known for dangers to your waistline, but they can be just as hazardous to your mental health. If you feel anxiety, sadness, or uneasiness this time of year, you’re not alone. The holiday blues can even manifest themselves physically, causing headaches, insomnia, uneasiness, and intestinal problems.
  • Exercise is one of the key ingredients to good mental health as well as physical, so start by taking note of the body tips above. Yoga, walking, and spiritual practices may also help you get in touch with what’s important this season.
  • Still, keeping up your spirit while shopping in a crowded mall, driving through extra traffic, or being away from your family or loved ones isn’t easy.
  • Start by giving yourself a break. Some people feel worse during the holidays because there is pressure to feel happy. The holidays don’t automatically take away any current feelings you’re experiencing and they are never going to produce the same feelings you had as a child. Don’t let expectations ruin your chance for happiness.
  • Next, don’t overload your schedule. Exhaustion isn’t going to improve your mood. There is always too much to do, so choose your crucial plans and tasks and stick to that list. However, if you are feeling underbooked, volunteer at a homeless shelter, or with groups that help hospitalized children. Community service is a wonderful way to lift your spirit.
  • Finally, watch the alcohol intake. Alcohol is a depressant, and a hangover is definitely not going to lift your spirits.

If you find yourself feeling blue this holiday season, contact us for help.

Wash Your Hands to Prevent Illness

Friday, 15 December, 2017
Henry the Hand hand washing

Keeping hands clean is one of the best ways to prevent illness. Next week, Dec. 6 -12, is National Handwashing Awareness Week, and it’s a great time to teach children (and remind adults) about basic handwashing principles:

  1. Wash your hands when they are dirty and BEFORE eating.
  2. DO NOT cough into your hands.
  3. DO NOT sneeze into your hands.
  4. Above all, DO NOT put your fingers into your eyes, nose or mouth.

“Washing our hands with soap and water is one of the important most important things we can do to help prevent diseases such as respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses,” according to Cristine Macomber, MD. “Appropriate hand washing can limit the spread of diseases in our family and in our communities.”

Check out these fun and kid-friendly dowloadable information sheets!

 

Wellness for Generations November 2015 newsletter

Friday, 15 December, 2017
Wellness for Generations November 2015 newsletter

Look and feel your best this holiday season with tips from Generations Family Practice! Read our latest newsletter, "Wellness for Generations - November 2015" and find info on healthy eating for diabetics, beating acne breakouts, what’s cool about moustaches and more!

 

Q&Ped - The HVP vaccine and your daughter

Friday, 15 December, 2017
HPV vaccine and your daughter's health

“I want to do everything I can to make sure my 13 year-old daughter is healthy and protected. But I am confused by the HPV vaccine and whether she should have it.”

Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, is very common. It is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. Nearly all sexually-active men and women will get at least one type of HPV at some point in their lives. Most people never know that they have been infected and may give HPV to a partner without knowing it. About 79 million Americans are currently infected with HPV. About 14 million people become newly infected each year.

There are approximately 40 types of genital HPV. Most HPV infections (9 out of 10) go away by themselves within two years. But, sometimes, HPV infections will persist and can cause health problems. Problems can include cervical cancer in women and other kinds of cancer in both men and women. Other types can cause genital warts in both males and females. The HPV vaccine works by preventing the most common types of HPV that cause cervical cancer and genital warts. It is given as a 3-dose vaccine.

For HPV vaccines to be effective, they should be given prior to exposure to HPV. In other words, prior to becoming sexually active. Preteens should receive all three doses of the HPV vaccine series long before they begin any type of sexual activity and are exposed to HPV. Another reason to give it to children ages 11-12 years of age is that the HPV vaccine produces a higher immune response in preteens than it does in older teens and young women.

Protection provided by HPV vaccine should be long lasting. Data from clinical trials and ongoing research show that HPV vaccine lasts in the body for at least 10 years without becoming less effective. There is no evidence, at this time, to suggest that HPV vaccine loses the ability to provide protection over time.

The vaccine has been available for 10 years and the most common side effects are mild: pain and redness in the area of the shot, fever, dizziness, and nausea. Some children may feel faint after getting the vaccine; sitting or lying down for 15 minutes is advised, particularly after the first immunization.

If you have any further questions, please contact us today.

[Info obtained from CDC]

Q&Ped - Too Much TV Time?

Friday, 15 December, 2017

"My daughters want to be on their Kindles all day long playing games and reading. They say all of their friends spend a lot of time too. Am I being too strict by trying to restrict their play time?"

Today’s children spend, on average, seven hours a day on screen time: watching TV, playing video games, using the Internet.

The AAP recommends limiting screen time to 1-2 hours per day, with none for children under two years of age.  Screen time includes the use of cell phones, DVDs, video games, tablets, etc. Most parents probably agree that limiting screen time is a good idea.  In my house, limited screen time has lead to less  squabbling, more reading, more creative play, more outdoor activities and more physical exercise.

How can we limit our children’s screen time?

Consider having your children earn screen time- by doing extra chores, extra practice time on a particular sport or musical instrument.

Limit screen time to weekends only OR have a TV screen time allotment for the week with the understanding that homework is completed first, chores are done, and there is no screen time right before bedtime.

Keep media out of the bedrooms and off during mealtimes.

Have books around! Turn music on!

Help your children with the shows they choose. Take time to watch shows with your children, allowing for bonding time and giving your opinion on content matter.

Be a good role model for your children: let them see you reading, doing activities, playing music, talking with each other!

October is Mental Health Awareness Month

Friday, 15 December, 2017

A healthy body also includes a healthy mind. But those with mental health struggles often face misunderstanding and harsh judgement that may cause them to hide their illness and avoid seeking help. 

As the Mental Health Foundation observes, “by failing to treat people with mental health problems with dignity we make it more difficult to ensure that everyone takes steps to safeguard their wellbeing and to seek help, as it can lead to self-stigma, low confidence, low self-esteem, withdrawal and social isolation.”

Mental health illnesses include a range of illnesses from depression and posttraumatic stress disorder to ADD and schizophrenia. All of these illnesses are not uncommon. In 2013, there were an estimated 43.8 million U.S. adults (18.5%) with some type of mental illness in the past year. According to the CDC, approximately 13 percent of children ages 8 to 15 had a diagnosable mental disorder within the previous year.

World Mental Health Day is October 10, and this year mental health organizations are striving to bring dignity to illnesses often cast in shadow. Generations Family Practice is happy to assist patients in finding the appropriate mental health care. Call us today to get the help you deserve.

Here are some startling facts related to Mental Health in America~


 

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